Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Beer’

This is a press release from Great Divide about their party this Saturday. I helped one of the people there (Hilary) brew a batch for the party, so you should all go and drink it. Ask for A Night With Pamela Anderson…

Brewery Celebrates Milestone With Limited-Release Beer, Party

Denver, CO—Great Divide Brewing Company, one of America’s most acclaimed microbreweries, will celebrate fifteen years in business on June 6, marking the occasion with a limited-release oak-aged double IPA and a party at the brewery featuring live music, food and a number of special beers.
In 1994, Colorado’s craft beer scene scarcely existed, but Brian Dunn recognized Denver’s potential to be a great beer city. Combining his business background with his passion for beer, which was developed through his international travels and his experience as a homebrewer, he decided to start a brewery. He set up shop in an abandoned dairy-processing plant at the edge of downtown Denver and began brewing the beers that, over the past fifteen years, have carried Great Divide Brewing Company to its status as one of America’s most decorated microbreweries and helped transform Denver into an international destination for beer lovers.
“It’s been a fantastic ride,” says Dunn. “We started out with two beers, doing everything by hand, and we’ve just grown and grown and grown. Just in the past year, we’ve added a state-of-the-art new bottling line, quadrupled our (admittedly small) barrel-aging program, opened a patio for the Tap Room, and released seven new seasonal beers, with more to come. We’re all having a ton of fun doing it, and looking back at how far we’ve come in fifteen years, I can’t even imagine what the next fifteen will bring.”
To celebrate this milestone, Great Divide will release 15th Anniversary Wood Aged Double India Pale Ale. Based on the brewery’s most award-winning beer, Denver Pale Ale, this copper-hued treat is a celebration of everything Great Divide does best. Plenty of malty sweetness provides a backdrop for earthy, floral English and American hops, while French and American oak round off the edges and provide a touch of vanilla.
“We really think this beer sums up everything we’ve come to be known for over the past fifteen years,” says Dunn. “Like all of our beers, it will be assertive and flavorful but also balanced and drinkable, and it’s a combination of classic elements with more innovative touches.”
15th Anniversary, which is at 10.0% alcohol by volume and 90 International Bittering Units, will be available in 22-ounce bottles and on draft through August 1.
Great Divide will release 15th Anniversary Wood Aged Double India Pale Ale at its 15th anniversary party, which will be held at the brewery on June 6 from 2-7 p.m. In addition to their first taste of the new beer, partygoers will get to enjoy delicious food, live music by Denver bands Dressy Bessy, the Swayback, and Young Coyotes, and plenty of other Great Divide beers, including some well-aged versions of old favorites and a number of small batches brewed just for this event. All of this merriment will be included in the ticket price of $20, and Great Divide will donate a portion of the proceeds to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Denver and the Colorado Environmental Coalition.
“This party should be an equally great time for our devoted fans and anybody who just wants to spend a beautiful Denver afternoon with good music, good food and great beer,” says Dunn. “Come help us celebrate fifteen years and say cheers to many, many more.”
#######
15th Anniversary Double IPA

15th Anniversary Double IPA

Denver, CO—Great Divide Brewing Company, one of America’s most acclaimed microbreweries, will celebrate fifteen years in business on June 6, marking the occasion with a limited-release oak-aged double IPA and a party at the brewery featuring live music, food and a number of special beers.

In 1994, Colorado’s craft beer scene scarcely existed, but Brian Dunn recognized Denver’s potential to be a great beer city. Combining his business background with his passion for beer, which was developed through his international travels and his experience as a homebrewer, he decided to start a brewery. He set up shop in an abandoned dairy-processing plant at the edge of downtown Denver and began brewing the beers that, over the past fifteen years, have carried Great Divide Brewing Company to its status as one of America’s most decorated microbreweries and helped transform Denver into an international destination for beer lovers.

“It’s been a fantastic ride,” says Dunn. “We started out with two beers, doing everything by hand, and we’ve just grown and grown and grown. Just in the past year, we’ve added a state-of-the-art new bottling line, quadrupled our (admittedly small) barrel-aging program, opened a patio for the Tap Room, and released seven new seasonal beers, with more to come. We’re all having a ton of fun doing it, and looking back at how far we’ve come in fifteen years, I can’t even imagine what the next fifteen will bring.”

To celebrate this milestone, Great Divide will release 15th Anniversary Wood Aged Double India Pale Ale. Based on the brewery’s most award-winning beer, Denver Pale Ale, this copper-hued treat is a celebration of everything Great Divide does best. Plenty of malty sweetness provides a backdrop for earthy, floral English and American hops, while French and American oak round off the edges and provide a touch of vanilla.

“We really think this beer sums up everything we’ve come to be known for over the past fifteen years,” says Dunn. “Like all of our beers, it will be assertive and flavorful but also balanced and drinkable, and it’s a combination of classic elements with more innovative touches.”

15th Anniversary, which is at 10.0% alcohol by volume and 90 International Bittering Units, will be available in 22-ounce bottles and on draft through August 1.

Great Divide will release 15th Anniversary Wood Aged Double India Pale Ale at its 15th anniversary party, which will be held at the brewery on June 6 from 2-7 p.m. In addition to their first taste of the new beer, partygoers will get to enjoy delicious food, live music by Denver bands Dressy Bessy, the Swayback, and Young Coyotes, and plenty of other Great Divide beers, including some well-aged versions of old favorites and a number of small batches brewed just for this event. All of this merriment will be included in the ticket price of $20, and Great Divide will donate a portion of the proceeds to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Denver and the Colorado Environmental Coalition.

“This party should be an equally great time for our devoted fans and anybody who just wants to spend a beautiful Denver afternoon with good music, good food and great beer,” says Dunn. “Come help us celebrate fifteen years and say cheers to many, many more.”

Read Full Post »

Beer in Italia? I hope so

Beer in Italia? I hope so

PJ asked me to write a blog post about Italian beer because Emily and I are headed to Europe on Wednesday.  My response was, “Why? To say it’s terrible?” I don’t want to get into a fight with anyone about the merits (or lack thereof) of the three Italian national brews, but my opinion is that the three (Peroni, Moretti and Nastro Azzuro) are at the most, mediocre macrobrews.

I have tried to think if I know of any sort of craft brewing in Italy. I have not once heard of even homebrewing. However, I know a TON of Italians that make their own liquor. So if I had to sum it up in one extremely generalizing way, I’d say Italians know how to distill and ferment, but not brew.

So I have a challenge to propose to the field! Find me a micro or craft brewer in Italy and Emily and I will try to visit! Luckily we are also voyaging to other far reaches of Europe (and a little bit of Asia too!) so we will be able to delight in some delicious beer, but we’re also big on trying local fare. Leave any suggestions in the comments area and we’ll try to check it out.

Also, enjoy this lovely posting in Wikipedia about liquor consumption per capita around the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_alcohol_consumption

Oh Italy. Good thing I like wine too, eh?

[PJ’s Note: Let’s find them a LOT of breweries to stop by. Thanks G!]

Read Full Post »

I don’t have much to write about right now, but I feel like writing something. Things are progressing in a very steady and positive direction. I keep meeting people who are awesome, helpful, and excited about this venture. The occasional bubble-burster is out there – and I really appreciate their feedback, as it keeps me grounded and makes me think – but they are far and few between those who are excited to help out, be a part of this, or just drink our beer when we sell that first bottle. Everyone asks what the brewery is called. I. Still. Don’t. Know. But I think we’re almost there. MHBC might take the cake.

So why the post? Well, I’m brewing right now. I’ve got two buckets mashing (the cooler STILL isn’t ready..). I just tasted a kit brew we did a few weeks ago, and even that tastes delicious. Not up to the usual standards, but still better than a lot of beers I see at bars and stores. We bottled the Rye Dry Stout yesterday – thanks Phill for your help – and it’s SO tasty and SO dark. I’m just overly excited about everything brewery-related right now.

Yes, I love beer. This is obvious. Anyone who’s known me for a while knows that pretty darn well. I also love sharing. Sharing knowledge, sharing stories, sharing my home, sharing a good time. Doesn’t matter. Sharing is caring or something. Anyway, those people who have seen me drink my share of beers through college know that I love hosting, guiding, leading, creating, and overall just making sure those around me are having a good time, sometimes at the expense of my own enjoyment. The more I talk about this brewery, the more I realize that that’s what this brewery is. It’s the epitome of what this paragraph has stated. It’s beer. It’s good beer. It’s knowledge both learned and given. It’s events, gatherings, and stories, all rolled in to a bottle of tasty fermented sugars. I think my excitement today, as I sit on my back porch in the Denver sun, typing away as the starches convert to sugars in what will most likely become a staple recipe in the brewery, is one more step in a very long journey towards these dreams, goals, aspirations, and life.

So ya, this post has no real relevance to the business behind opening a brewery. But I thought I’d share my passion with those who follow this blog. I hope to pour a pint for many of you in the very near future. Here’s to good beer.

Read Full Post »

My handwriting is way worse than this..

My handwriting is way worse than this..

  • Brew! (http://twtpoll.com/fqcrrt to input)
  • Maybe bottle the stout, keg the wit
  • Email DU Business profs about having some MBA students help with the B. Plan
  • Talk so some engineers (Like Mike!)
  • Talk to my landlord about brewing in the garage
  • Find a new place to live if ^ goes poorly
  • Maybe call up the TTB about ^
  • Look into small commercial real estate properties if ^ goes really poorly
  • Talk to the guys at the homebrew shop about ordering in bulk
  • Join a homebrew club (I know, I know, why haven’t I done this yet)
  • Enjoy a beer.

Read Full Post »

This will all be a coherent thought in the end. Trust me. I want to discuss a few things about beer and history involving geography, weather, nutrition, division of labor and feminism. Although I should probably go way back to the first millennia B.C.E., I’m going to concentrate on early Renaissance to the beginning of Early Modern Europe.

Female Brewster (its hard to find images of this..)

Female Brewster (it's hard to find images of this..)

Geography

Why does one think of Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, England, etc., when it comes to beer, whereas France and Italy are the wine countries? Just like real estate, it’s all location, location, location. The main ingredients for beer (water, grains of some sort, hops and yeast) grow well in the northern climates. Thus, beer and its various siblings and cousins (such as mead, ale, etc.) was created, crafted and perfected in these locales. However, apart from the materials being readily available, there was another reason why beer was so important in these northern countries.

Weather

Beer’s grain ingredients keep fresh long past their harvest date, whereas other alcoholic beverage ingredients don’t (think grapes without refrigeration). It is possible to harvest all of the grains for beer when ready and keep them stored without any special materials (salt or cold) as long as you keep them away from scavenger rodents. Hops on the other hand can go stale, but if they are going stale, you can use more. For our historical discussion, let’s remember that the brewers were not entered in Craft Beer Week. Therefore, it is possible to make beer all winter long.

Nutrition

Most of all, beer was used as nutritional fortification. Today, many pansy drinkers complain about calorie intake when drinking beer, which was one of the original purposes behind the drink. To survive cold winters in northern Europe, calories were key and when a surplus of food was rarely available, beer was a crucial staple in the local diet.

And here’s where this whole thing gets really cool…

Division of Labor and Feminism

Traditionally, men were the brewers in medieval England. However, for a 300 year stretch beginning in late medieval England, women took over the brewster role. The reason behind this change had to do with time management. It was easier for a woman to brew beer while conducting her other daily tasks, such as rearing children, which allowed men to leave the home for manual labor jobs. Women also created ways to trade off tasks with friends and neighbors to garner relief from the work load. Households would congregate and each household would trade-off brewing beer for the other households in the group so that one house didn’t have to constantly brew for themselves. Of course, some were better than others and this ensured a market for higher quality goods. This methodology created a scenario for guild formation and also regulations. However, by the 1600s, men had stolen the task of brewing back from women as technology and techniques became more advanced. At this point breweries for production on a larger scale started cropping up, which pushed women out of the limelight of beer creation.

Monks drinking beer

Monks drinking beer

As this brewery takes shape and hopefully flourishes from a household operation to mass production, it is easy to understand how time management affected the gender of the brewers in the late medieval/early Renaissance in England. I have heard many complaints on a week day that “I’d rather be brewing than sitting at work,” and hopefully with help from both genders, we’ll be able to make that happen.

If anyone is looking for more information, I learned about women brewsters in a class on Medieval families at Colorado College. I highly recommend reading this short, fascinating book:

Bennett, J. M. Ale, Beer, and Brewsters in England: Women’s Work in a Changing World, 1300 to 1600. (Oxford University Press, 1996).

Read Full Post »

Bobby Orr celebrating with The Stanley Cup, looks delicious

Bobby Orr celebrating with The Stanley Cup. Looks delicious.

Here at [No Name Yet] Brewing, we like a good beer. In fact, we like lots of good beer. We hope that we don’t come off as beer snobs ever. If anything, we prefer the accepted vernacular “beer geeks”. We think everyone has the right to enjoy their beer how they see fit; there is no right or wrong way. Some other people might say you have to drink a beer out of the proper glass in order to enjoy it. Well, I think there are some exceptions. For instance, how about drinking delicious beer out of the greatest trophy in all of sports (IMHO), the Stanley Cup. Or maybe, in a time honored tradition of “shooting the boot”, a rugby boot is the only option. Sipped from a timeless treasure while celebrating a victory or chugged from a sweaty rugby boot, salty aftertaste and all, these drinkers are enjoying their beer, regardless of the lack of a “proper” drinking apparatus. If you have any creative examples of beer drinking methods let us know. We are kind of partial to “Gelande Quaffing,” but are open to most methods of consumption.

The snobs connoisseurs, however, certainly do know how to bring out the characteristics of a beer with the proper glass. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong in my analysis of the glasses below.

Nonic glass, note the bulge near the top

Nonic glass, note the bulge near the top

We start with one of today’s standards: The Pint Glass. Usually served as a 20-ounce glass (an imperial pint) in the UK and 16-ounces in the US, the pint is a versatile glass that is cheap, easy to make, and easy to store.  “Conical” pint glasses are just that, an inverted cone that tapers out at the top, and “nonic” pint glasses (pictured) have a bulge near the top, some say for better grip and they won’t stick together when stacked.  In either form, just a few of the many beers that are commonly enjoyed out of these glasses include:

  • English India Pale Ale (IPA)
  • American Pale Ale (APA)
  • Scottish Ale
  • Irish combinations (Black & Tan, Half & Half, etc.)
  • American Porter
  • American Stout
  • English Porter
  • English Stout
  • Barley wine
This ones just right

This one's just right

Another vessel one commonly thinks of is a mug or stein. Definitions vary as to what can be considered a stein, and what is simply a mug. They both have handles, are generally sturdy, and can withstand more abuse during celebration or anguish. They are easy to drink out of and some hold a larger volume of liquid. They can be made from numerous materials but the most common are glass and stainless steel, while pewter and ceramic were more often the material of choice in the past. In the late 1400’s large swarms of insects commonly attacked Northern Europe, prompting the Germans to cover their steins with a lid.  Many of the same beers that are commonly served in a pint glass are also served in mugs or steins.  Some additional beers include:

  • Oatmeal Stout
  • Extra Special/Strong Bitter (ESB)
  • Milk/Sweet Stout
  • Smoked Beer
  • Vienna Lager
  • English Strong Ale
  • Doppelbock
  • Euro Dark Lager
  • Bock
Nice and refreshing on a spring day, oh wait its snowing on April 1, 2009 in Colorado

Nice and refreshing on a spring day. Oh wait, it's snowing on April 1, 2009 in Colorado.

Pilsner glasses are a more delicate tapered glass with a short neck at the bottom, they are typically found in sizes slightly smaller than pint glasses. They are designed to enhance the colors of a Pilsner while retaining a head.  Pilsner glasses also show clarity and carbonation, and enhance volatiles. Obviously, pilsners are ideally suited to this class of glass, but many other lighter beers are commonly served in pilsner glasses for similar reasons.  Some include:

  • American Malt Lager
  • American Pale Lager
  • German Pilsener
  • Euro Pale Lager
  • Japanese Rice Lager
  • Munich Helles Lager
  • American Adjunct Lager
Traditional tulip glass

Traditional tulip glass

A Tulip glass is designed to enhance the characteristics of beers with large foamy heads. The top is pinched in to retain the head longer and enhance volatiles and strong aromas that often accompany these types of beers. Scotch Ales are commonly served in a variation of the tulip glass that resembles a thistle, the national flower of Scotland. Beers served in tulip glasses include:

  • American Double/Imperial IPA
  • Belgian Dark Ale
  • Belgian IPA
  • Belgian Dark Strong Ale
  • Scotch Ale/Wee Heavy
  • Quadrupel
  • Farmhouse Ale
I just hope that is some 90 Minute IPA

I just hope that is some 90 Minute IPA

Another round bottomed glass, the Snifter, is also commonly associated with brandy and cognac.  It’s wide bowl tapers to the mouth, locking in aromas of stronger ales, and providing a perfect venue for swirling to release additional aromas.  These glasses usually have a short neck and can vary in height and volume.  Stronger beers that are commonly served in a snifter include:

  • IPA
  • Belgian Strong Ale
  • Barley wine (of several varieties)
  • Flanders Red Ale
  • Russian Imperial Stout
  • American Double/Imperial IPA
  • Wheat wine
  • Scotch Ale
  • Tripel
Traditional shape with a masterful pour, someone knew what they were doing

Traditional shape with a masterful pour, someone knew what they were doing

The Weizen/Wheat beer glass is self explanatory, but if you missed it, wheat style beers are served in them. Their thin walls and tall stature showcase the colors, clarity (or lack there of), and carbonation of wheat beers. It is also designed to retain the head and aromas of these beers. They are wide at the top and have a slimming hourglass figure with a sturdy base to offset the height.  Expert servers will take care and slowly pour the beer to produce a large head and release the aromas of the beer. Some more common wheat beers that are served in these glasses are:

  • Dunkelweizen
  • Hefeweizen
  • Gose
  • American Wheat Ale
  • Weizenbock
  • Kristalweizen

In contrast to the rather elongated and shapely weizen glasses, there is the elegant and often ornate Goblet (or Chalice).  Delicate and thin goblets are often adorned with a

Just a standard Chalice

Just a standard Chalice

gold or silver rim, while the heavier thick walled goblets often have a sculpture like stem.  Scoring the inside of the bowl of a goblet can create channels where streams of carbonation are release to keep a perfectly maintained head.  The wide mouth is perfect for taking robust sips that are a perfect balance between liquid and head.  Traditionally, some of the following beers are served in goblets:

  • Belgian IPA
  • Belgian Strong Dark Ale
  • Dubbel
  • Tripel
  • Quadrupel
3 feet of awesome

3 feet of awesome

One of the most recognizable glasses for beer is the Yard, which conveniently measures roughly 3 feet.  Since its introduction, in 17th century England, it has been a favorite of those brave few with the will to challenge each other and the beer.  The goal is to take down the entire yard without a single pause or break for a breath.   A yard’s average of 60-ounces (US) can strain even the most seasoned imbiber.  There are a few tips out there to help take down this beast.  1) Pace yourself, there is no point in rushing, unless you are trying to break the world record of 5 seconds.  2) Slowly spin the glass as you drink to improve flow. 3) Watch out for the bulb, once air enters the bulb at the bottom of the glass a wave of beer heads towards the drinker, but don’t over correct, or the beer will stop flowing and you fail.  But, not addressing the bulb is equally as dangerous, leaving the drinker with a soaked shirt and a disappointed audience.  As the yard has gained popularity it is common to see many types of beers served in a yard or half yard (you can figure that one out on your own).  Traditionally English beers are served in yards, but Irish and Scottish beers are commonly served in yards here in the US.  Some include:

  • English Ale
  • English Dark Ale
  • English Strong Ale
  • English Porter
  • English Stout
  • Scottish Dark Ale
  • Scotch Ale
  • Irish Stout
  • Irish Porter

We have saved the best for last, and that would be the rugged taster from the Great American Beer Festival.  The miniature Weizen glass, made out of Lexan is the perfect solution for sampling the 1800 beers from over 400 breweries during the annual celebration in Denver, CO.  With a 1-ounce sample it would be 150 12-ounce beers to try each one!  This little guy makes the perfect vessel for any beer, delivering everything your heart desires.  Put a reminder on your calendar today for September 24-26, 2009!

nuf said

'nuf said

Read Full Post »

Rye

Rye

The other day, I was eating a delicious sandwich. It was  peppered turkey, pepper jack cheese, and spicy mustard, on a nice Jewish rye. At some point, I was nibbling on a rye seed, and BAM, it opened up. Utterly delicious. So much flavor in that one little seed. And I thought, “hmm, this is utterly delicious! I should make beer out of this.” And thus, a recipe has been developed.

[Note: My office just closed due to the snow, so if this seems rushed, it’s because I want to get out of here]

I decided to make a Dry Stout, but a Wheat was also in the works. Let me know what you think of the following recipe, any tips you might have, etc.

  • 10 lbs 2-Row
  • 2 lbs Dark Munich
  • 3 lbs Flaked Rye
  • 1 lb Roasted Rye
  • 1 lb Black Patent
  • 1/4 lb Chocolate Wheat
  • 1 oz Perle (8.2%) @ 60 minutes
  • 1 oz Cluster (7.0%) @ 15 minutes
  • White Labs WLP013 London Ale Yeast

I’m thinking a nice long mash and a 60 minute boil should do the trick. I’d like to get a slightly creamy, very slightly hoppy, dry stout with a tinge to slight rye flavor. According to Beer Tools (I’m at work, I can’t do all the math right now…), this should result in approximately 1.060 OG, 1.015 TG, a brown/black color (32.54 SRM), ABV of almost 6%, and a bitterness rating of 34.8. The image below is the actual output in Beer Tools.

For those who have played with rye before, let me know what you think! For anyone else who knows what those numbers mean, let me know your thoughts too. And for those who have no idea what I’m talking about, ask questions!

Recipe

Recipe - click for full size

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »